Drunk American tourist's Nazi salute sparks German punch-up

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The Associated Press is reporting that a "drunken American man" was summarily slugged for giving the Nazi salute in downtown Dresden, Germany.

The Independent are reporting that the 41 year old sustained minor injuries after the assault which occurred at 8.15am on Saturday morning. A police test showed that he was heavily intoxicated with a blood alcohol level of 0.276 percent.

His assailant fled the scene, and is being sought for causing bodily harm.

The police have launched a procedure for the use of "symbols of unconstitutional organizations" by the tourist.

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Police would not identify the man, in accordance with German law, but said he was cited for making the salute, which is illegal in Germany.

It's the second time in August that tourists have gotten themselves into legal trouble for giving the Nazi salute.

The Nazi salute, Hitlergruß in German, is performed with the right arm straight and pointed forward slightly at an angle upward with palm down. A conviction can carry a prison sentence of up to three years, although courts often impose fines instead.

The Nazi salute, which was banned in Germany after World War II, is a greeting gesture used to express obedience to Adolf Hitler in Nazi Germany, a government that permitted and encouraged the killing of people who were of different racial or ethnic origin.

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