GOP Senate Bill Would Cut Health Care Coverage By 22 Million

Share

Reductions in Medicaid spending and smaller subsidies would lead to substantial declines in coverage among people under the age of 65. If more than two GOP senators defect, the bill will fail.

The CBO estimated that under the GOP plan, 15 million people would drop off coverage next year primarily because the Obamacare penalty for not having insurance would be eliminated.

McConnell said Trump has been "fully engaged" in the process, and will host all Senate Republicans at a special meeting at the White House at about 4:00 pm (2000 GMT) today.

Obama's health law enacted an additional 3.8 percent tax on investment income for married couples making more than $250,000 a year and individuals making more than $125,000. That could be a particular concern to Sen.

Mike Lee (R-Utah) said he will oppose beginning debate on the Senate health care bill, voting no on a procedural vote that would put into motion the final vote for an overhaul of the country's health care system. Susan Collins, R-Maine, and Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska, have said the CBO's uninsured numbers will be important in how they decide whether to support the bill or not.

US mayors bypass Trump to back Paris goals
Washington's pullout from the Paris climate deal has sparked global outrage and led to massive protests within the US. Dane County has already created a new Office of Energy and Climate Change.

'Manzanita' wildfire scorches 1200 acres south of Beaumont
Voluntary evacuation orders were issued for Higland Home, Death Valley, Longhorn and Shirleon drives. The cause of the fire was determined to be the result of a traffic collision with fire.

Horror bungee disaster that killed teen caused by 'poor English'
The bungee jumping company initially said Mol caused her own death because she leapt off the bridge before she was told to. Mol was a novice at bungee jumping, and she was the last in her travel group to make the attempt.

HORSLEY: The original Senate bill, which was unveiled last week, required insurance companies to offer coverage to everyone, including those with pre-existing medical conditions, but it didn't have any kind of requirement for individuals to have health insurance. And for those families struggling with the opioid crisis, this bill pulls the rug right out from under them.

I'm the health reporter for St. Louis Public Radio, and I'm curious about what you would like to know about the Republican bid to rewrite the nation's health care law. "The increase would be disproportionately larger among older people with lower income" - especially those between 50 and 64 and with incomes below 200 percent of the poverty level, or around $30,300 for a single person. The provision, added to the bill on Monday, would make anyone who did not maintain coverage in the prior year wait six months before being able to access coverage benefits if they signed up the following year.

The bill's biggest victims, according to the budget office, would be poor elderly people.

Incentives give people a reason to get covered even when they're not sick, and they pay into the pool of funds available to help lower costs for everyone.

The bill, which would roll back much of President Barack Obama's health care law, has been one of the party's top priorities for years, and the delay is a major embarrassment to Trump and McConnell.

Share